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Learn More About Cold-Formed Steel Framing

 
 
 

Cold-formed steel refers to a manufacturing process where galvanized sheet steel is roll-formed into products such as studs, joists, track, headers, angles, truss members and other components. For cold-formed steel framing, typical material thicknesses range from 0.0147 in. (0.373 mm) to about 1/8 in. (3.175 mm). Cold-formed steel framing products are typically made from zinc-coated cold-rolled steel with yield strength of 33 ksi or 50 ksi.

Wall members are typically vertical lipped channel “stud” members, which fit into unlipped channel “track” sections at the top and bottom. Similar configurations are used for both floor joist and rafter assemblies, but in a horizontal application for floors, and a horizontal or sloped application for roof framing. Additional elements of the framing system include fasteners and connectors, braces and bracing, clips and connectors. Cold-formed steel floor and roof trusses are also available for cold-formed steel framing applications.

Cold-formed steel framing is a durable, reliable and cost-effective option for low-rise and mid-rise building projects. It typically refers to light-frame construction where the vertical and horizontal structural elements are primarily formed by a system of repetitive framing members. The framing members are typically spaced at 16 or 24 inches on center, with spacing variations lower and higher depending on the loads and coverings.

Cold-formed steel framing in North America is typically designed and constructed in accordance with standards developed by the American Iron and Steel Institute. Cold-formed steel framing lends itself to architectural layouts where the floor and roof systems are supported on bearing walls. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Resources

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